Overview#

The universal identity metasystem must define the human user to be a component of the distributed system integrated through unambiguous human-machine communication mechanisms offering protection against identity attacks.

Law of Human Integration is a Law defined in the The Seven Laws Of Identity.

We have done a pretty good job of securing the channel between Web servers and browsers through the use of cryptography—a channel that might extend for thousands of miles. But we have failed to adequately protect the two or three foot channel between the browser's display and the brain of the human who uses it. This immeasurably shorter channel is the one under attack from phishers and pharmers.

No wonder. What identities is the user dealing with as she navigates the Web? How understandably is identity information conveyed to her? Do our digital identity systems interface with users in ways that objective studies have shown to work? Identity information currently takes the form of certificates. Do studies show certificates are meaningful to users?

What exactly are we doing? Whatever it is, we've got to do it better: the identity system must extend to and integrate the human user.

Carl Ellison and his colleagues have coined the term 'ceremony' to describe interactions that span a mixed network of human and cybernetic system components—the full channel from Web server to human brain. A ceremony goes beyond cyber protocols to ensure the integrity of communication with the user.

This concept calls for profoundly changing the user's experience so it becomes predictable and unambiguous enough to allow for informed decisions.

Since the identity system has to work on all platforms, it must be safe on all platforms. The properties that lead to its safety can't be based on obscurity or the fact that the underlying platform or software is unknown or has a small adoption.

One example is United Airlines' Channel 9. It carries a live conversation between the cockpit of one's plane and air traffic control. The conversation on this channel is very important, technical, and focused. Participants don't "chat"—all parties know precisely what to expect from the tower and the airplane. As a result, even though there is a lot of radio noise and static, it is easy for the pilot and controller to pick out the exact content of the communication. When things go wrong, the broken predictability of the channel marks the urgency of the situation and draws upon every human faculty to understand and respond to the danger. The limited semiotics of the channel mean there is very high reliability in communications.

We require the same kind of bounded and highly predictable ceremony for the exchange of identity information. A ceremony is not a "whatever feels good" sort of thing. It is predetermined.

But isn't this limitation of possibilities at odds with our ideas about computing? Haven't many advances in computing come about through ambiguity and unintended consequences that would be ruled out in the austere light of ceremony?

These are valid questions. But we definitely don't want unintended consequences when figuring out who we are talking to or what personal identification information to reveal.

The question is how to achieve very high levels of reliability in the communication between the system and its human users. In large part, this can be measured objectively through user testing.

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« This page (revision-3) was last changed on 20-Jan-2016 13:41 by jim