jspωiki
Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for JSON Web Tokens (JWTs)

Overview#

Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for JSON Web Tokens (JWTs) (RFC 7800) describes how a JSON Web Token (JWT) can declare that the presenter of the JWT possesses a particular proof-of-Possession (PoP) key and that the recipient can cryptographically confirm proof-of-Possession of the key by the presenter.

Proof-of-Possession of a key is also sometimes described as the presenter being a holder-of-key.

The OAuth 2.0 Proof-of-Possession (PoP) Security Architecture specification describes key confirmation, among other confirmation mechanisms.

The Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for JSON Web Tokens (JWTs) specification defines how to communicate key confirmation key information in JWTs.

The Proof Key for Code Exchange by OAuth Public Clients describes a Proof-of-Possession technique through the use of Proof Key for Code Exchange.

Representations for Proof-of-Possession Keys#

By including a "cnf" (confirmation) claim in a JWT, the issuer of the JWT declares that the presenter possesses a particular key and that the recipient can cryptographically confirm that the presenter has possession of that key. The value of the "cnf" claim is a JSON Object and the members of that object identify the Proof-of-Possession key.

The presenter can be identified in one of several ways by the JWT depending upon the application requirements. If the JWT contains a "sub" (subject) claim JWT, the presenter is normally the subject identified by the JWT. (In some applications, the subject identifier will be relative to the issuer identified by the "iss" (issuer) claim JWT.)

If the JWT contains no "sub" claim, the presenter is normally the issuer identified by the JWT using the "iss" claim. The case in which the presenter is the subject of the JWT is analogous to Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) 2.0 (OASIS.saml-core-2.0-os) SubjectConfirmation usage. At least one of the "sub" and "iss" claims MUST be present in the JWT. Some use cases may require that both be present.

Another means used by some applications to identify the presenter is an explicit claim, such as the "azp" (Authorized party) claim defined by OpenID Connect OpenID.Core. Ultimately, the means of identifying the presenter is application specific, as is the means of confirming possession of the key that is communicated.

More Information#

There might be more information for this subject on one of the following: